Drug and Alcohol - Opioid Addiction

Percocet: Everything You Need to Know About Perks

Perks Drug: Everything You Need to Know

Perks is a slang term for Percocet, an opioid painkiller that's unfortunately often abused. Learn more about perks addiction and abuse in our blog.

Written by

brian-mooreBrian Moore

Content Writer

Reviewed by

jeremy-arztJeremy Arzt

Chief Clinical Officer

Drug and Alcohol

Opioid Addiction

March 29, 2023

Percocet abuse is a growing problem in the United States and is often associated with the broader opioid epidemic. In recent years, there has been a sharp increase in prescription opioid overdose deaths in the U.S., with Percocet and other opioids being significant contributors.

The abuse of Percocet and other prescription opioids often begins with a legitimate prescription for pain management. However, some people become dependent on the drug and develop a tolerance, leading them to take larger doses to achieve the same effect. This can quickly spiral into addiction, which can have serious consequences such as overdose and other health problems.

By the Numbers

Among illicit drug use behaviors in the U.S., marijuana consumption comes in second place, followed by the abuse of prescription opioids. Women have experienced an increase in overdose fatalities from prescribed opioids of more than 400% since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared to men, who have seen a 265% increase in overdose deaths from prescribed painkillers.

What Is Percocet?

"Perks" is a nickname for Percocet. Oxycodone, an opioid pain reliever, and acetaminophen, a non-opioid painkiller, are the two active components of the prescription drug Percocet. Due to the high risk of abuse and addiction, it is categorized as a Schedule II controlled substance in the U.S.

The prescription drug medication called Percocet is used to treat moderate to severe pain. It contains oxycodone and acetaminophen, two of its active components. Acetaminophen is a non-opioid and fever reducer, whereas oxycodone is a potent opioid pain reliever. A doctor generally prescribes Percocet to treat persistent pain following surgery, an injury, or other medical conditions.

To reduce the feeling of pain, oxycodone in Percocet binds to particular receptors in the brain and nervous system. It is a strong painkiller used to treat severe pain uncontrollable by other analgesics. The extended use of oxycodone, however, can result in physical dependence and opioid addiction because it is a highly addictive drug.

On the other hand, acetaminophen prevents the body from producing specific chemicals that cause pain and inflammation. Even though it's a less potent analgesic than oxycodone, it works well when used with oxycodone to treat moderate to severe pain.

Percocet is available in different strengths, and the dosage is typically adjusted according to the severity of the pain and the patient's response to the medication. It is taken orally in tablet form, usually every four to six hours, as needed for pain relief.

Like all opioids, Percocet risks side effects, including drowsiness, dizziness, constipation, nausea, and vomiting. Long-term use of Percocet can also lead to tolerance, where the body requires higher doses of the medication to achieve the same pain relief. This can increase the risk of overdose and other serious health complications.

How Strong Is Percocet?

Perks pills are brand-name prescription medication that combines two active ingredients: oxycodone and acetaminophen. Oxycodone is an opioid pain reliever, while acetaminophen is a non-opioid pain reliever that can enhance the effects of oxycodone. Perks pills are typically used to treat moderate to severe pain that cannot be managed with other pain medications.

Percocet Dosages

Perks pills come in various strengths, with the oxycodone component ranging from 2.5 to 10 milligrams. The amount of acetaminophen in Perks pills also varies depending on the strength, with amounts ranging from 325 milligrams to 650 milligrams.

Perks pills are classified as a Schedule II controlled substance by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) due to their potential for abuse and addiction. They are only available by prescription from a healthcare provider and should only be taken as directed. Misuse or abuse of Perks pills can lead to serious health consequences, including overdose and death.

Percocet 5/325 Tablet

This form of Percocet contains 5 mg of oxycodone hydrochloride, and 325 mg of acetaminophen.

Percocet 10/325 Tablet

This form of Percocet contains 10 mg of oxycodone hydrochloride, and 325 mg of acetaminophen.

Perks pills, also known as Percocet, come in several different forms, including:

Form

Description

Tablets

The most common form of Perks pills is as oral tablets. These are usually white, oval-shaped pills that can vary in size and strength depending on the dose.

Capsules

Perks pills may also be available in capsule form, although this is less common than tablets. Capsules are typically filled with the medication and can be taken orally.

Liquid

Perks pills may also be available as a liquid suspension. This form is typically used for individuals who have difficulty swallowing pills.

It's important to note that perks are just a street name of a medication containing oxycodone and acetaminophen. Other brand names for this medication include Roxicet, Tylox, and Endocet. Regardless of the brand name, all medicines containing oxycodone and acetaminophen have the potential for abuse and addiction and should be used only as directed by a healthcare provider.

CTA background

We’re Here to Help You Find Your Way

Would you like more information about how long Perks stay in your system? Reach out today.

Is Percocet Different From Norco?

Percocet and Norco are both opioid medications, but they differ in a number of important ways. Percocet is a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen, while Norco contains only hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Oxycodone is more powerful than hydrocodone, so Percocet can be used to treat more severe pain. However, because Percocet contains acetaminophen, it can cause liver damage if taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Norco does not have this same risk of liver damage.

Percocet is often prescribed for short-term relief of moderate to severe pain, while Norco is usually recommended for more mild to moderate pain. It is important to talk to your doctor about which medication is right for you and discuss any potential side effects.

Both medications can cause a variety of side-effects, including nausea, constipation, drowsiness, dizziness, and dry mouth. They also have the potential for abuse and addiction if taken in larger doses than prescribed, so it is important to follow the directions of your doctor and take the medication as prescribed.

In short, Percocet and Norco both contain opioids but differ in strength and potential side effects.

Is Percocet Different From Vicodin?

Percocet and Vicodin are both opioid medications, but they differ in a number of important ways. Percocet is a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen, while Vicodin contains hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Oxycodone is more powerful than hydrocodone, so Percocet can be used to treat more severe pain.

CTA background

We’re Here to Help You Find Your Way

Do you have more questions about how long Perks stay in your system? Reach out.

How Does Percocet Work?

Percocet is a combination of two active ingredients: oxycodone and acetaminophen. Here is the explanation of how each of these components works in more detail:

Oxycodone

Oxycodone is a potent opioid pain reliever that works by binding to specific receptors in the brain and nervous system, called mu-opioid receptors. When oxycodone binds to these receptors, it reduces the sensation of pain and can also produce feelings of euphoria, relaxation, and sedation. The drug mimics the natural endorphins produced by the body, which are neurotransmitters that act as natural painkillers.

Oxycodone is highly effective in managing moderate to severe pain but is also highly addictive and can lead to physical dependence and addiction with prolonged use.

Acetaminophen

Acetaminophen is a non-opioid pain reliever and fever reducer that works by blocking the production of certain chemicals in the body that cause pain and inflammation. Acetaminophen is not as potent as oxycodone in relieving discomfort, but it can enhance the pain-relieving effects of oxycodone. Acetaminophen is also commonly used alone to treat mild to moderate pain and reduce fever.

Together, oxycodone and acetaminophen work synergistically to provide more effective pain relief than either medication alone. Acetaminophen can enhance the pain-relieving effects of oxycodone while also reducing fever, and oxycodone provides potent pain relief that can effectively manage moderate to severe pain.

What Are the Symptoms of Addiction to Percocet?

Any opioid medicine, including Percocet, can cause addiction, progressing quickly and having adverse effects. Despite the potential harm, addiction is a chronic disease characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior. Here are some of the most common symptoms of Percocet addiction:

Increasing Tolerance

One of the first signs of Percocet addiction is the need to take higher doses to achieve the same pain relief. This is known as tolerance and is a sign that the body has become accustomed to the effects of the drug.

Percocet Withdrawal Symptoms

If you stop taking Percocet suddenly or reduce the dosage, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating, chills, anxiety, irritability, and insomnia. These opioid withdrawal symptoms can be severe and may drive the person to continue using the drug to avoid withdrawal.

Seeking More Medication

Addiction to Percocet can lead to compulsive drug-seeking behavior, including doctor shopping, stealing medication from others, or buying Percocet illegally.

Obsessive Thoughts

Addiction can cause obsessive thoughts about Percocet, including planning how to get the next dose and being preoccupied with the medication.

Neglecting Responsibilities

Addiction to Percocet can lead to neglecting responsibilities at work, home, or school or withdrawing from social activities.

Continuing to Use Despite Negative Consequences

Addiction to Percocet can cause a person to continue using the drug despite negative consequences, such as legal problems, financial difficulties, or strained relationships. 

CTA background

We’re Here to Help You Find Your Way

Do you need advice about how long Perks stay in your system? Reach out today.

What Are the Side Effects of Percocet?

Percocet is a powerful pain medication that contains the active ingredients oxycodone and acetaminophen. While Percocet can be highly effective in treating moderate to severe pain, it can also cause a range of side effects, including:

Side Effect

Description

Nausea and vomiting

These are common side effects of Percocet, which can be reduced by taking the medication with food.

Constipation

Percocet can cause constipation, which can be alleviated by increasing fiber and fluid intake and taking stool softeners.

Dizziness and drowsiness

These side effects can affect a person's ability to drive or operate heavy machinery and can increase the risk of falls.

Headaches

Percocet can cause headaches or worsen existing ones.

Dry mouth

This is a common side effect of opioids and can be relieved by drinking plenty of fluids and chewing sugarless gum.

Itching

Percocet can cause itching or hives, which may require treatment with antihistamines.

Respiratory depression

Respiratory depression is a severe side effect of opioids that can cause slow or shallow breathing and may be life-threatening. Respiratory depression is more likely to occur with higher doses of Percocet.

Liver damage

Acetaminophen can cause liver damage, especially when taken in high doses or for extended periods. Symptoms of liver damage may include yellowing of the skin or eyes, dark urine, or abdominal pain.

Addiction

Percocet is highly addictive and can lead to physical dependence and addiction with prolonged use.

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Pecocet?

Percocet withdrawal symptoms can vary in severity and duration depending on the individual's level of dependence and the length of time they have been using the drug. Withdrawal symptoms typically begin to occur within 6 to 12 hours of the last dose and may include:

  • Nausea and vomiting

  • Diarrhea

  • Abdominal cramping

  • Muscle aches and pains

  • Sweating

  • Chills

  • Anxiety

  • Agitation

  • Irritability

  • Insomnia

  • Fatigue

  • Dilated pupils

  • Rapid heartbeat

  • High blood pressure

In some cases, withdrawal symptoms may be severe and may require medical attention. Severe symptoms of withdrawal may include seizures, hallucinations, and delirium tremens (D.T.s). D.T.s are a potentially life-threatening complication of withdrawal that can cause fever, rapid heartbeat, seizures, and confusion.

CTA background

We’re Here to Help You Find Your Way

Would you like more information about how long Perks stay in your system? Reach out today.

What Are the Signs of a Percocet Overdose?

Percocet overdose can occur if too much of the medication is taken, leading to a number of dangerous and potentially deadly side effects.

Signs of a Percocet overdose include:

  • Severe respiratory depression

  • Extreme drowsiness

  • Unconsciousness

  • Confusion

  • Cold and clammy skin

  • Slow or fast heart rate

  • Muscle weakness

If any of these symptoms occur after taking Percocet, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. An overdose can be fatal if left untreated, so it is important to act quickly.

How Long Does Percocet Stay in the System?

The length of time that Percocet stays in the system can vary depending on several factors, including the individual's age, weight, metabolism, and the dose and frequency of the medication taken. Generally speaking, the half-life of oxycodone (one of the active ingredients in Percocet) is around 3-4 hours, meaning that it takes the body to eliminate half of the drug.

In most cases, Percocet can be identified in a person's blood for up to 24 hours after the last dose. Percocet can be detected in urine for up to 3-4 days after the last use, depending on the dose and frequency of use. In hair, Percocet can be detected for up to 90 days after the last use. It's important to note that these timeframes are estimates, and the actual detection window can fluctuate depending on the individual and the specific testing method used.

Percocet is a controlled substance with a high risk for abuse and addiction. It's essential to take Percocet only as a healthcare provider prescribes and to avoid taking more than the recommended dose or frequency. Misusing Percocet can increase the risk of overdose and other serious health complications.

Recovery From Addiction to Percocet

Recovery from addiction to Percocet can be challenging, but it is expected with the right support and resources. The first step in recovery is to seek help and support from a healthcare provider or addiction treatment professional. They can help develop a personalized treatment plan that meets your unique needs and addresses your addiction and any underlying issues.

Treatment for Percocet addiction may involve several different components, including:

Drug Detox

Detoxification is the process of eliminating Percocet from the body while managing withdrawal symptoms. Drug detox is typically conducted under medical supervision and may involve medications to help manage withdrawal symptoms.

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)

MAT involves the use of medications, such as buprenorphine or methadone, to help manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings for Percocet.

Behavioral Therapy

Behavioral therapy involves working with a therapist or counselor to develop coping skills, manage triggers and cravings, and address underlying psychological issues that may contribute to addiction.

Support Groups

Support groups can provide peer support and a sense of community for people in recovery from Percocet addiction.

Lifestyle Changes

Changing your lifestyle, such as adopting a healthy diet and exercise routine, getting enough sleep, and engaging in activities that promote relaxation and stress reduction, can help support recovery.

Family and Social Support

Having the support of loved ones and a strong social network can be crucial in the recovery process.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment

Dual diagnosis treatment is suitable for individuals with a co-occurring mental health disorder and addiction to Percocet. Dual diagnosis treatment combines addiction treatment with therapy to address the underlying mental health disorder.

Aftercare

Aftercare involves continuing care and support after the completion of treatment. This may involve ongoing therapy, support groups, and other resources to help maintain sobriety and prevent relapse.

Perks Addiction Can Be Deadly. Get Treated for Percocet Abuse at The Edge Treatment Center

At The Edge Treatment Center, we specialize in assisting people who are battling with perks abuse. Our team of experienced specialists is dedicated to delivering comprehensive and personalized care to assist our patients to overcome their addictions and achieve long-term recovery. To assist our patients in addressing the underlying psychological and emotional issues that contribute to their addiction, our outpatient drug rehab offers a variety of behavioral therapies in addition to medicine.

We are committed to helping our patients at The Edge Treatment Center in overcoming their Percocet addiction and achieve long-term recovery. If you want to learn more about how we can help you leave perks behind for good, reach out today.

CTA background

We’re Here to Help You Find Your Way

If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, there is hope. Our team can guide you on your journey to recovery. Call us today.